PersonalisedLearning. A Starter Kit

Personalised learning should not just be a catchphrase. It is something that must be actively cultivated in teachers who are struggling with the demands of 21c education. Personalised learning should be embedded in the thoughts and day-to-day practices of all teachers. But what does it look like? Lets talk about the basics and see if you are ready to begin your new teaching journey. (If you haven’t already started.)

Firstly and most importantly you need to be aware of two learning theories that have dominated the educational landscape for the last 35 odd years. They are a must know for all teachers. The first is known as ‘Multiple Styles’ and there is a wealth of evidence to support this approach in the classroom*. The idea behind Multiple Styles is that each child will learn in a vastly different way. I will leave you to research this theory, but here are some quick ideas to give you a flavour.

One ‘style’ of learning that some students will exhibit is the “Emotional-ego-centric’ style. This child will become very emotional if he/she is not treated as the most important in the class. To support the learning of this student it is vital that they are not asked to learn anything they won’t engage with. Secondly they must be treated as though the entire classroom revolves around them. This is not to be confused with the excellent Student–centred model. The Emotional-ego-centric child must be the only centre of the classroom. It is advisable not to have two Emotional-ego-centric learners in the class otherwise things become unbalanced.

Another Multiple Style is Mathematical-illogical. Students exhibiting this style must not be taught Maths in the traditional style. They should be learning in a way that seems very illogical to the teacher. It won’t make sense to you but the discovery-learning student will have it covered. Don’t panic, this student won’t be good at Maths per se, but may discover something much more important, creativity!

Lets move on to the second theory known as ‘Learning Intelligences”. The key factor is not to get Learning Intelligences and Multiple Styles mixed up. They are very different. Learning Intelligences has a broad well-documented research base behind it^. The idea is that students will develop and show outwardly different sorts of intelligences. One common type of Learning Intelligence is the Kinesthetic-Vitriolic intelligence. This student will learn best when allowed to touch to learn. This may also involve touching and taking possession of the property of other students and then dealing with any protests with a strong often vulgar verbal attack. This student must be allowed the freedom to learn this way and thus teach other students where they stand in the pecking order in the classroom.

Okay, that’s great, but how do I find out how my students learn best? To find out what Multiple Style and Learning Intelligence your students are, it’s best to just ask them. Children are remarkably accurate in assessing how they learn best#. If you then follow this up with a questionnaire rubric for both theories via a quick Google search then you are on your way!

Hopefully this has given you a little background to these important learning theories and the impact they have had on how we understand our students. If you are not using these theories to guide your teaching practice, you may just be letting your students down.

*Debunked

^ Not really

# Baseless drivel

MJ

@seminyaksunset

Bricklayers with Shit Mortar

I spent some time in my younger days working as a brickie’s labourer. It was a tough job but I was young, I liked working outside, and I was working for a mate. We worked hard, finished each day with 3 or 4 beers and enjoyed actually building things. I say ‘we’, because my mate said I was the most important person on the job site. He took great pride in his work but always made a point of saying that he couldn’t achieve much if the mortar wasn’t perfect. I think we can use this as a metaphor in education generally.

There is lots of discussion in education circles about making sure students are ready for the rapid changes that the 21c is bringing. We need by all accounts collaborative, entrepreneurial, critical thinking and connected problem-solvers that construct their own knowledge to succeed in this new exciting world. There are any number of educhats and conferences that reflect this urgent, insatiable need to pass these skills on so that students may succeed in the new work order. I personally think this drive is something of an ill adventure but assuming it’s not, these skills mentioned above are the bricks of education. We just don’t seem to talk often enough about the mortar.

The mortar is strong basic skills in literacy and numeracy. Without this mortar the bricklayer (student) if not helpless, is at the very least laying less than stable brickwork. I was chided on more than one occasion for mixing up sub standard mortar on the job. It held up construction and made the job that much harder.

It’s not particularly popular on Australian edutwitter to mention that we have so many students finishing high school without strong foundations in literacy and numeracy. The main focus is what’s coming up around the corner to engage and drive student learning, and how can we disrupt the paradigm and rush to the new age. But we need to talk about the mortar. Yes, the piles of new bricks look great, but without the mortar to hold them together they are just a pile of bricks. Get you mortar mix right first, then we are ready to grab some bricks and we can start building.

MJ

@seminyaksunset